Iraqi Voices: Mini Film Fest

Written on September 7, 2017, by

Iraqi Voices: Mini Film Fest is a series of short documentary films written and directed by Iraqi-Minnesotan refugees and immigrants, photographed and edited by Nathan Fisher. Iraqi Voices is a collaborative art program operated by the Iraqi and American Reconciliation Project that gives Iraqi immigrants and refugees in Minnesota an artistic platform to share their stories.

The screenings are at 7PM on September 15 & 16, but don’t miss these other opportunities to dig deeper into the issues and art:

September 15: Come early (6PM) for a thought-provoking discussion with Iraqi Voices filmmakers, moderated by Tricia Heuring, Public Functionary’s Co-Director/Curator. The film screening starts at 7PM, with a reception to follow!

September 16: Don’t miss the 3PM workshop & conversation about the craft of documentary filmmaking moderated by Film Director, Producer, and Writer E.G. Bailey of Tru Ruts . $7 Suggested Donation. RSVP Required: http://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/3075951

FILM TICKETS | $7: http://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/3075898
Seating is limited – get yours today!

*Part of the Brown CINEMA Café series*

Staged Reading of Birds Sing Differently Here at Dreamland Arts

Written on September 5, 2017, by

In March 2017, 12 Iraqi-Minnesotan immigrants and refugees came together under the direction of theater artists Taous Claire Khazem and Dylan Fresco to create an original and innovative theater performance based on their personal stories as a part of our Iraqi Voices project. They continued an extensive creative process for eight weeks, learning ensemble work and participating in storytelling and theater exercises. Rehearsals for the show began in July, with a staged reading version of Birds Sing Differently Here on stage at Dreamland Arts in August.

The diverse intergenerational cast included nine Iraqi Voices participants (Nada Alabbasi, Ali Alshammaa, Hannaa Al-Azzawi, Mazin Chilab, Abdullah Flaija, Adel Naji, Dhifaf Sarhan, Ahmed Al Shaikhli and Bahaa Al Shaikhli) and four professional actors (Ashawnti Ford, Dylan Fresco, Aamera Siddiqui and Mohammed Yabdri).

Each of the three nights were sold out! The premiere of Birds Sing Differently Here will be at the Guthrie in October.

 

Official premiere of Birds Sing Differently Here as part of the theater’s Level 9 Series, all tickets for productions in the Dowling Studio are $9. To purchase, call the Box Office 612.377.2224 or toll-free 877.44.STAGE or visit here.

DATE: October 27, 28, 29
TIME: 7:30pm and 1:00pm
LOCATION: Guthrie Theater, Dowling Studio

 

Iraqi and American Potluck and Barbecue

Written on August 31, 2017, by

 

 

 

 

 

Join us for our annual Iraqi and American Potluck and Barbecue!

Saturday, September 9th we will be celebrating our annual Potluck at Minnehaha Park Wabun C. Arrive at 4:30 and check in before the food begins at 5.

Food, games, and fun for the whole family!

Potlucks are about sharing. Bring a food dish that relates to your background or simply the one you enjoy most. Drinks and halal kabobs will be provided. If you are unable to bring a dish to share, please bring a donation to cover the evening’s expenses instead.

Kids activities, soccer, backgammon, bingo, and more! Join us in creating a space for sharing food, good company, and the beautiful Minnehaha views.

This activity is funded in part by the Laura Jane Musser Fund. Kids Activities sponsored by Champlin Super Target.

 

Iraqi Voices at the Guthrie!

Written on August 14, 2017, by

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It is our pleasure to announce that October 27-29, IARP will partner with the Guthrie Theater to present Birds Sing Differently Here. In conjunction with the performance, audiences will be able to engage with the work from IARP’s Iraqi Voices program, a collaborative art lab that gives Iraqi immigrants and refugees in Minnesota a platform to share their stories through bookmaking, documentary filmmaking and visual art.

Birds Sing Differently Here is a theater piece based on the true stories of 12 Iraqi-Minnesotan refugees and immigrants, directed by Taous Claire Khazem and created by Dylan Fresco, Taous Claire Khazem and Iraqi Voices program participants. Birds Sing Differently Here weaves together tales of sweetness, sorrow, grief and discovery. Inventively performed in both English and Arabic, participants come together with a cast of professional actors to tell “the story of a thousand olive pits and seven thousand praises, tokens of love and a chilling escape from the desert of death.”

The Iraqi Voices participants and ensemble include: Nada Alabbasi, Sumaya Ameen, Ali Alshammaa, Hannaa Al-Azzawi, Abdullah Flaija, Salwa Mohialdeen, Adel Naji, Arwa Naji, Dhifaf Sarhan, Mazin Chilab, Ahmed Al Shaikhli, Bahaa Al Shaikhli, Rawan Al Shaikhli, with Mohammed Yabdri, Dylan Fresco, Aamera Siddiqui and Ashawnti Ford.

To purchase tickets, call the Box Office 612.377.2224 or toll-free 877.44.STAGE or visit here.

Women’s Friendship Group

Written on August 10, 2017, by

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In early 2017, IARP established a women’s friendship group as a chance for the women to be hosted in each others’ homes, interact in a positive space, and engage with the diversity of each others’ cultures.  This group has been a huge success; in fact, IARP has already received inquiries about starting new groups.

Group member and coordinator Sue Johnston touches on one of the goals of the group in her words below,

“Today I celebrated my 200th day of resisting Trump, with the Iraqi/American Women’s Friendship Group. Through the Iraqi American Reconciliation Project, I have the opportunity to spend time each month with these fun and interesting Iraqi-Minnesotans.

How is this resisting Trump? Trump said in Poland: “We (western civilization) write symphonies…..we reward brilliance. We strive for excellence, and cherish inspiring works of art that honor God. We empower women as pillars of our society and of our success, We put faith and family, not government and bureaucracy, at the center of our lives. ” I resist this world view that denigrates the contributions of Iraqi and Middle Eastern culture. These women are educated, cultured, strong and funny. The more we open up to those who are different from us, the richer we and our culture becomes!”

Welcome our new Development and Program Associate!

Written on August 7, 2017, by

IARP continues to be committed to challenging xenophobic and Islamophobic rhetoric and supporting an expanded understanding of one another. In order to meet the needs of our increased programming in 2017 and beyond, we are delighted to welcome Allie Harris to the IARP team as our part-time Development and Program Associate! Allie has her M.A. in Islamic Studies and has been interning with IARP since January of this year.

Greetings,

After finishing my M.A. in Islamic Studies from the University of Denver in Summer 2016, I moved to Minnesota and found the Iraqi and American Reconciliation Project. I am so lucky to have IARP be my introduction to the Twin Cities. I have had the pleasure of meeting and working with some amazing individuals and I find myself constantly inspired by the work of those around me.

Interning with IARP over the last seven months has been an incredible experience. The work I have done in our community has refreshed my passion for my field. In my time with IARP, there are a few moments that stand above the rest. In February, I was able to participate in a beautiful, peaceful march through the streets of Minneapolis in support of refugees and then write a blog about the event for our website. In May, I had the pleasure of attending the Festival of Nations. Thousands of people visited our booth, anxious to learn more about Iraq and I was excited to use this opportunity to practice my Arabic while writing visitors names. In June, I watched as Muslims and non-Muslims came together to celebrate Ramadan at our Iftar dinner. In a time when it is so easy to see the hate in this world, IARP has shown me the beauty of cultures coming together to learn about and accept each other. This is what I love most about this organization, and what I look forward to working towards more in the future.

Non-profit work is new to me and I am beyond excited to continue learning and growing with IARP. The love and respect I have gained for this organization drives me to work hard and I hope to bring this drive to my new position as Development and Program Associate. This is the first time IARP has hired a second employee and I am honored to continue my work with this organization. The directors, board, volunteers, and community members have been wonderful these last seven months and I look forward to working with all of you in the future; thank you for this opportunity.

Sincerely,
Allie

Meet our Iraqi Art Project Intern: Abby Massell

Written on July 30, 2017, by

Hello! My name is Abby Massell and I’m a senior at Macalester College studying International Studies, Political Science, and Arabic. I grew up in Burlington, Vermont and have had wonderful
opportunities to study and travel in Morocco, Jordan and Palestine.  At Macalester, I’ve spent my
time outside of academics singing in one of Macalester’s choirs and a cappella groups,
participating in Macalester Students United for Palestinian Equal Rights, as well as advocating
for the admission of displaced students to Macalester alongside a dedicated group of peers. It
has been a pleasure spending my first summer in the Twin Cities getting to know places and
people beyond the Macalester neighborhood, aided in particular by my internship with IARP.
While I do not yet have plans for after graduation, I hope to find a career in advocacy and
education with a goal to equalize access for those in my local community as well as abroad.

 

Cooking Class with the Good Girl’s Giving Club

Written on July 20, 2017, by

The Iraqi and American Reconciliation Project recently teamed up with The Good Girl’s Giving Club to hold a cooking class. The Good Girl’s Giving Club is a group of women who meet every month to discuss and donate to a worthy cause. Each month, the group is hosted at a different house, and the host is responsible for choosing an individual or an organization to receive the donation. On Tuesday, July 11, IARP met with eight of these women when we were invited to teach a cooking class.

 

Shaymaa Jakjook was our honorary Iraqi chef for the night. Shaymaa taught us all how to make an Iraqi version of Chicken Biryni. This is a multi-layered meal with chicken, rice, and a mixture of Arabic noodles, raisins, and almonds. We also had a lesson on how to make Iraqi bread. Shaymaa brought prepared dough that had already risen. She went through the process of stretching the dough, creating the shape, and her expert technique of flipping the dough onto a hot pan. Once Shaymaa had shown the steps a couple of times, some of the other women tried their hand at the art of making Iraqi bread.

 

While we cooked, the women in the giving group had an opportunity to hear Shaymaa’s story about coming to the United States as well as the story of her life in Iraq. As we sat down to dinner, Shaymaa’s phone began to play the call to prayer. This sparked a discussion on praying: how often Muslims pray, the routine of prayers, the differences between subject matter of prayers, etc. It is always refreshing to take part in conversations such as this one. All of the women in attendance were asking great questions and listening with open minds while also sharing their stories in a welcoming environment. This was my first Iraqi cooking class and it perfectly embodied the ideals behind out People to People project. This group of women helped us reach our goal of fostering cultural exchanges and intercultural understanding. I am so glad I was able to learn – and eat – with such an amazing group of women.

 

Chicken Biryni Recipe 

Ingredients: (Enough for 12 people or more)

  1. 2 Whole chicken.
  2. 5lbs white rice.
  3. 1lb
  4. 1lb
  5. 1lb Arabic noodles.
  6. 6tbsp
  7. 6tbsp
  8. 6tbsp
  9. 1lb
  10. 1 small green peas.
  11. 1 cup corn oil.

 

Instructions:

  1. Rinse the rice then soak it in water for 15 minutes. Add suitable amount of water to cook the rice in a cook pot and leave it on the cooktop until it starts boiling. Drain the rice from the water and add it to the boiling water with continuous stirring for 5 to 10 minutes until the rice is half cooked. Rice is drained from water and put back in an empty cook pot on the cooktop on a low temperature until serving time.
  2. Part the chicken into 4 or 8 pieces as preferred. Chicken pieces are rinsed with water. Cover all chicken pieces with water in a cook pot on the cooktop until it starts boiling, then add two spoons turmeric, cumin and the oregano spices and a big peeled onion. Leave on low temperature until the chicken is done. Chicken pieces are either served right away with rice or fried until red.
  3. Peel the potatoes and cut them into small chunks then put them in boiling water until they are half done. After that, drain them and leave them aside.
  4. Cook the Arabic noodles in the oil and keep on stirring until their color turns brown. After that, add water and leave them on the cooktop for 10 minutes until they are fully cooked, then drain them from the water.
  5. Onions are finely chopped and cooked in oil with continuous stirring until their color turns gold.
  6. Half of the onions are mixed with all of the potatoes with an addition of a little bit of oil. Keep stirring on a low temperature until the potatoes’ color turns brown, then add the noodles to the mix with the remaining of the spices.
  7. Add the rest of the onions to the green peas and raisins on a low temperature for couple of minutes with continuous stirring then take them of the cooktop and add them to the mix in point number (6), then put everything on a serving plate.
  8. Chicken and rice are served in the same serving plate or in separate ones as preferred.

 

Iraqi bread recipe 

Ingredients: (Makes 10 pieces of bread)

  1. 3 cups all purpose flour.
  2. 5 – 2 cups of water depending on the flour used.
  3. Full tsp instant yeast.
  4. 2tbsp  Or, add salt as preferred.

 

Instructions:

All ingredients are mixed together at once until a soft dough is formed. Place the dough ball in a bowl, cover and allow it to rise for a some time depending on the room temperature, or an hour as an average. Divide the dough into small pieces according to the desired bread size. Leave the pieces outside in open air for 10 minutes. Bake the bread in the oven until done and ready to serve.

Ramadan iftar, Iraqi and American Community Dinner 2017

Written on June 19, 2017, by

At the beginning of June, and the beginning of Ramadan, we had the pleasure of celebrating an Iftar meal with 85 members of our community. This was our second time hosting the Iraqi and American Community Dinner, and the event more than doubled in size. Together, we raised $1,475 towards dignity projects for displaced Iraqis fleeing Mosul and our general mission.

The evening began with a wonderful presentation on Ramadan by Sumayah Ameen. Ramadan is the ninth month of the Islamic calendar, and is observed by Muslims worldwide as a month of prayer, fasting, and charity-giving to commemorate the first revelation of the Quran to Muhammad. Fasting during Ramadan is one of the “five pillars” of Islam, and is performed to learn compassion, self-restraint, and generosity. Iftar is the evening meal at sunset when Muslims end their daily fast during Ramadan.

Next, several community members shared what Ramadan meant to them. As guests lined up to pile on plates (waiting until all could be served so that all could break fast together per tradition) the speaker played the “athan”, the traditional call to prayer. We broke fast together as a community at sunset on June 2nd, and with the large number in attendance, everyone worked together quickly to load up plates with dates, pita, kefta, and many other delicious dishes.

The night ended with a sneak preview of this year’s Iraqi Voices theater project, performed by Iraqi community members. We cannot wait until the full piece premieres this fall! Thank you for joining us for this year’s Iftar event, and if you were unable to attend we look forward to an even larger event next year. Ramadan Mubarak to all!

 

Meet our Summer Intern: Allison

Written on June 15, 2017, by

Hello, my name is Allison Brady. I grew up in Cincinnati, Ohio, and moved to the Twin Cities two years ago to begin my studies at Macalester College. I am a Junior majoring in International Studies with a focus on environmental policy and Arabic. I am passionate about environmental and humanitarian issues in the MENA region, and interested in the field of refugee response. I am excited to work with an agency that leads community building here in the Twin Cities through exchange of dialogue, culture, and language, and supports humanitarian efforts in Iraq. I am particularly excited about People to People projects, as I have been a part of Interfaith dialogue communities for many years, and am committed to the healing potential of community exchanges. I speak French, am learning Arabic, and will be headed to Morocco next semester to begin a year of Arabic studies in the region. ​