Meet Our New Intern: Nicole

Written on February 1, 2017, by

Hello, my name is Nicole and I am currently a student at the University of Minnesota. I am a senior studying global studies with a focus in the Middle East and human rights and justice. I am also a French major and an Arabic minor. I am from Minneapolis, so it is exciting to be more involved in my community, and to pursue my passions locally. I am very thankful to have the opportunity to work with an organization that I strongly support.

New Winterization Project in Mosul

Written on January 18, 2017, by

IARP would like to show appreciation to all who have supported the window winterization project in Mosul. Working in partnership with the Critical Needs Support Foundation, IARP has been able to fund the winterization of 10 family homes. This project is focused on the Alkhadraa neighborhood which was liberated from ISIS in October of 2016. During the conflict, many homes and apartments suffered damage. In order to help these families prepare for the cold winter months, CNSF is sealing windows with heavy plastic. This simple service allows families to remain in their homes despite cold winter winds.

CNSF is an Iraqi non-governmental organization aimed at providing support to those impacted by the ongoing war with ISIS. CNSF also helps the people of Iraq through projects such as medical assistance, orphan support, and emergency relief. For more information on their projects, visit the CNSF website.

To help support other humanitarian projects, visit the Humanitarian Projects for Peace page.

Christmas in Karbala by Cathy Breen

Written on January 3, 2017, by

Published with permission from Cathy Breen

Dec. 25, 2016

Karbala, Iraq–It is Christmas day, and I am in Karbala with dear friends. We awoke to a second day of rain, and pictures of flooding, especially in Baghdad, are being shown on TV. Yesterday, on Christmas-eve, several tents caught fire in a camp for the internally displaced near Mosel. As I write you, I am looking at the charred remains of one of the tents on TV. Angry people are describing what happened, lifting high the kerosene heaters for all to see. And, of course, the conflict in Mosel is foremost in the news. I am missing a translator this morning as my host is at work. But I would like to relate something from last week’s events.

Over the years, we have made many contacts in Najaf through our generous host there, Sami. These include doctors, dentists, hospital personnel and University deans. On one particular morning last week two presentations for me had been arranged, one at a Medical college, another at a college of Dentistry. As Voices for Creative Nonviolence we are eager to hear from young people, and rather than giving a presentation, I welcomed the opportunity for an open exchange.

One of the questions that repeatedly arose was “What will happen under Trump to all Muslims in America?”

“We want the U.S. to understand one thing” said a student. “Islam doesn’t mean terrorism.”

When asked if there was any interest in the US elections, a female student spoke up. “The elections were not important for us, but somehow the U.S. rules the world and I think the elections for the U.S. president should be worldwide. I was really disappointed in Trump.” Another student felt that it didn’t matter who was elected, the U.S. policy would remain the same.

Both Najaf and Karbala house holy Shia shrines and thousands of pilgrims visit both cities annually. They are two areas which, thank God, have remained for the most part safe and stable. It is one of the reasons we can travel here.

One of the first students to speak in the lecture hall of about 150 students said “On facebook I get the impression people think we are dodging bullets and bombs every day. We live a normal life.” Someone retorted, but not harshly, “And in Mosel or in other parts of Iraq?” And there was a feeling of agreement in the room that Najaf has been spared the violence, destruction and death that beset most other parts of the country.

“We have to start by changing the corrupt government,” said one, “a government the U.S. put in. But I don’t know how to bring about that change.”

On another day, we visited the Middle Euphrates Cancer Center which opened in 2014 and provides radiation and chemotherapy. Fifty percent of their patients come from the middle Euphrates area and they receive patients from the internally displaced population as well.

They have entered a critical period in terms of budget cutbacks. As the incidence of cancer increases throughout the country, the Ministry of Health (which provides 90-95% of their services) is cutting their budget by 50% in 2017. In 2013 the budget was 3.7 billion dollars. In 2016 the budget was $1,2 billion dollars. The salaries are fixed, but the cuts will affect drugs, equipment and specifically cancer care. Last week 85 items in their drug stock were depleted; 50% of their overall stock is depleted. The Minister of Health can only provide 6% of their needs. This is indeed distressing news.

Just prior we visited El Sadder hospital. Walking through the halls, clean but in a state of disrepair, I was reminded of the time of economic sanctions. In one of the sitting rooms, a doctor sat down next to me and immediately began to tell me of two great needs: 1. deficiency in orthopedic supplies and 2. the need for training for their technicians. Could they come to U.S. for a month or more of training? I asked to see the prosthetic unit and was taken there immediately.

A personable young man named Hussein, 21 years of age, who had lost an arm (and had extensive scarring on his face) at 10yrs of age due to an explosion approached me. He spent time in Arizona receiving treatment, and his English was excellent. Hussein has many contacts with Shriner’s Hospital in NY city. I was given an itemized list of items they need. It would be a wonderful thing if Shriners could contact this hospital for some type of interchange and/or assistance.

I struggled with mixed emotions during the visit, feeling like a visiting ‘dignitary of importance’¯ being escorted through the halls and units. I remembered back to a young 12-year-old quadruple amputee, Mohammed. Four or five years ago, his father and prosthetic technicians brought him to the house where I was staying in Najaf. Could I help him get a prosthetic arm? For months on end I showed his picture and told his story in the states and in Jordan as well, trying to find some organization that could help. Coming home from school at six years of age, Mohammed had stepped on an electrical wire from a pole downed by a U.S. bomb. All of my/our attempts proved futile. I still find it painful to remember this boy, who had not been able to feed himself, itch his nose or embrace a fellow human being since he was six years of age. This experience has made me very hesitant to receive similar requests.

Last night my host read to me from the Koran the account of Jesus’s birth. It was a special way to spend Christmas eve, assuring, that our faith traditions share much in common.

Meet our new intern: Allie Harris

Written on December 26, 2016, by

Hello, my name is Allie Harris. I have a Bachelor’s degree in Religious Studies and finished my Master’s in Islamic Studies in June. After finishing my degree in Denver, I moved north to the Twin Cities. So far, I am loving Minnesota and I could not be more excited to be involved in IARP. I am lucky to have this opportunity to be more involved in my new community, continue in the field I am passionate about, and, hopefully, work on my Arabic language skills.

Hygiene kits and Dignity Baskets

Written on December 14, 2016, by

IARP has been grateful to partner with the Critical Needs Support Foundation (CNSF) on a Humanitarian Project for Peace to bring hygiene kits and sanitation products to IDP’s in Iraq. The recent kits were for the people of Mosul who have fled from IS (Daesh). The CNSF team are working tirelessly on the ground to identify and respond to those in need.

The most recent distribution consisted of:

  • 68 hygiene kits in Al Haj Ali Village, south of Mosul, Ninewa Province

  • 60 hygiene kits in Hamam Al Alil, south of Mosul near Al Qayyarah, Ninewa Province

  • 270 Dignity Baskets in Alkhazer Camp, for displaced Iraqis feeling from Mosul (this distribution was funded in part by IARP and other humanitarian organizations).

 

The Dignity Baskets contained feminine hygiene products. The Hygiene Kits distributed in the villages each contained:

  • 1x towel

  • 5x toothbrush

  • 1x toothpaste

  • 1x shampoo

  • 1x body-wash

  • 1x baby shampoo

  • 1x lice shampoo

  • 1x q-tip

  • 1x feminine hygiene kit

  • 1x sponge pack for dish-washing

  • 1x dish-washing liquid

  • 1x plastic box

Here is a note from our partners at CNSF:

“Again, we thank you so much for your incredible support. You have helped us reduce risks to people’s health in a very simple but effective way. Disease can spread quickly, making an already difficult situation even more so. Most importantly, you are helping us protect their dignity.”

A campaign for Partners for Peace

Written on November 28, 2016, by

We are inviting for you to become a Partner for Peace and join our team of sustaining donors who generously give each month to IARP.

IARP’s Partner for Peace team provides a dependable, ongoing source of funding that fuels our unique work of reconciliation. You can become a Partner for Peace by clicking on any ongoing payment option (monthly or weekly) after choosing your desired amount on our GiveMn page or on our secure donation page here.

Becoming a Partner for Peace means you are making a commitment to partner with Iraqis and Americans working together to build a future free of hate, bigotry, and fear. Your interest in and support of our critical work means a great deal to all of us at IARP. Thank you.

Why become a Partner for Peace today? 

 

Reason #1: We provide an artistic platform to Twin Cities-based Iraqis to share their stories. Safe spaces like these are needed now more than ever.  Watch the Iraqi Voices films here: www.iraqiartproject.org/iraqi-voices/

Reason #2: We facilitate language, personal and professional exchanges in both Minnesota and Iraq.

Reason #3: We directly support humanitarian efforts on the ground in Iraq. In 2016, we partnered with the Critical Needs Support Foundation to distribute hygiene kits and supplies to Iraqis living in IDP camps. Learn more here: www.givemn.org/project/Water-For-Peace

Reason #4: We expose and share the diverse art and culture of Iraq and Iraqis in order to counter negative stereotypes. Learn more here: www.iraqiartproject.org/

“As Iraqi refugees, we have been through so much and film is a great outlet for us to express ourselves and gives us a cultural platform on which to reach a mainstream American audience. Through art, we can break down stereotypes and directly tell other Americans who we are and why we as new Americans are here.” – Jamal, Iraqi Voices participant

“As an Iraq War veteran and member of Iraq Veterans Against the War I am honored to be able to contribute to the work of IARP… I know I am responsible for contributing to the loss of so much for so many and the least I can do is find ways to take responsibility, demand the US pays reparations, and be grateful for every opportunity to reconcile this tragedy.” – Aaron Hughes, IARP Partner for Peace Team Member

“Being Sustaining Donors to IARP is one way to say ‘we are in this relationship for the long run’. We are tired of our tax dollars going for war and destruction; we want our money and resources to be invested in people working for peace and reconciliation.” – Steve and Christine Clemens, IARP Partner for Peace Team Members

Our Iraq Premiere

Written on November 28, 2016, by

Thank you to EVERYONE for making the premiere of OUR IRAQ a success!

OUR IRAQ is the 14th film in the Iraqi Voices series. A team of 10 local Iraqis created this film with Nathan Fisher and IARP.  OUR IRAQ begins with a sweeping overview of thousands of years of ethnic and religious coexistence in the cradle of civilization. The film then dismantles caricatures of Iraqis and Muslims in the United States — an Iraqi-American sculptor rebuilds what extremists have destroyed, Muslims pray at a Catholic church in Minneapolis, refugees own a St. Paul neighborhood grocery, and a public school administrator becomes the first Muslim woman to win an election in Minnesota.


This event was organized in collaboration with the Immigration History Research Center at the University of Minnesota. It is part of their year-long series of public programming, “Global Minnesota: Immigrants Past and Present”, funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Iraqi Voices 2016 Premiere Oct 29

Written on September 22, 2016, by

Join us for the premiere of a documentary film written and directed by Twin-Cities based Iraqi refugees and Iraqi-Americans, followed by a discussion with Joseph Farag, Assistant Professor of Arabic Literature and Culture (UMN), and filmmakers. Reception to follow.

Iraqi Voices is a collaborative arts lab which gives Twin Cities-based Iraqis an artistic platform to share their stories. The new half-hour documentary in the Iraqi Voices series dismantles caricatures of Iraqis and Muslims in the United States ”” Muslims pray at a Catholic church in Minneapolis, refugees own a St. Paul neighborhood grocery, and a public school administrator becomes the first Muslim woman to win an election in Minnesota. The films are photographed and edited by Nathan Fisher and produced by the Iraqi and American Reconciliation Project.

This event is organized in collaboration with the Immigration History Research Center at the University of Minnesota. It is part of their year-long series of public programming, “Global Minnesota: Immigrants Past and Present”¯, funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Event is free, suggested donation $10

October 29th, at 2:00pm
Landmark Center,
F.K. Weyerhaeuser Auditorium
75 5th St, St Paul, MN 55102

Iraqi Voices is made possible by the voters of Minnesota through a grant from the Minnesota State Arts Board, thanks to a legislative appropriation from the Arts and Cultural Heritage Fund.

This event is co-sponsored by the The Advocates for Human Rights.

Iraqi Voices at Mizna Arab Film Festival Oct 1!

Written on September 22, 2016, by

Excited as ever to be a part of this year’s Mizna Arab Film Festival!

Iraqi Shorts and Iraqi Voices at the Mizna Arab Film Festival on October 1 @ 1:00pm. The 2015 films will be screened as well as a sneak peak of our 2016 film. Q&A with filmmakers after screening. Come out and show your support for Iraqi filmmakers!

Learn more here.

 

 

 

Friends, fellowship, and fried kebbabs

Written on July 28, 2016, by

It’s friendship via food- even better, via fried food. This past Sunday five American women and six Iraqi women came together in the kitchen to cook, eat, and form relationships. Our Iraqi friends taught us how to make delicious fried kebabs and laid out a full spread of vegetable toppings and Iraqi bread. And while the meal was delectable, the company was even better. Despite the language barrier, we discussed food, our differing marriage traditions, memories from Iraq, and our experiences raising a family, going to school, and managing a career. When it was time to go all of the participants exchanged phone numbers and a hope that the dinner would turn into a monthly event.

20160724_170343

If you are interested in hosting or attending an Iraqi cooking class in the Twin Cities contact us at jessy@reconciliationproject.org

Also, check out the recipes we learned below!

Lamb and Ground Beef Fried Kebabs20160724_154142

1 kilo ground beef
1/2 kilo ground lamb

1 handful of each chopped:
onion (finely chopped)
parsley
green pepper
tomato

Approximately 1- 1 1/2 cups flour

Two teaspoons of each:
curry
cumin
black pepper

salt to taste

Using your hands, thoroughly mix all ingredients. Dip hands in water to keep meat from sticking . Form into patties, logs or balls.

Add lots of oil to pan. Heat it up and when the oil bubbles, put the meat in.

Fry 1-2 minutes per side, or until each side gets brown or as well done as like.

Serve with vegetables and herbs such as: spring onions, sliced onions marinated in sumac, mint, cilantro, parsley, Iraqi pickles (see below!), green peppers, tomatoes!

Wrap in Iraqi bread and enjoy!

Iraqi Pickles

pickling cucumbers
white vinegar
garlic cloves, crushed
kosher salt
ground coriander
curry powder
sugar

Put your cucumbers into sterilized mason jars. In a pot, boil white vinegar, garlic cloves, salt, sugar, and other spices. Use about 1 cup vinegar, ¼ cup salt, and ¼ teaspoon sugar per 1 pound of cucumbers.

Feel free to experiment with different spice combinations/quantities, and different kinds of vegetables! You can also stuff your cucumbers with garlic, parsley, onion, and other spices.

Pour the boiled brine over the cucumbers until the jars are full. Seal the jars.

Once the pickles change color they will be ready to eat- this will take approximately one week.

 

Sahtein!