New Travel Ban- Does not include Iraq

Written on March 6, 2017, by

Today, Monday March 3rd, Donald Trump signed a new executive order to replace the travel ban of January 2017. The new travel ban will take effect on March 16th.

A few key factors were revised between the two executive orders. The immigration ban signed on March 3rd only restricts immigration from six countries: Syria, Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, and Yemen. Iraq was removed from the list after the U.S. State Department spoke with the Iraqi government about improving methods of vetting Iraqis before entrance into the U.S. No specific changes to the vetting process were published.
Much like the original immigration ban, the new document states that citizen of the six countries will not be able to obtain visas for 90 days.

There will also be a suspension of refugees entering the U.S. for 120 days. Syrian refugees are included in the 120 day ban, as opposed to the indefinite ban on Syrian refugees proposed in the original travel ban.
The stated goal of this new executive order is to supposedly improve the vetting process of immigrants into the U.S. In fitting with this goal, the order allows for extending the ban beyond the six countries listed. It states that the Department of Homeland Security will have 20 days to review the identity and security information that all countries provide to U.S. officials. If the Department of Homeland Security determines more information is needed from specific countries, those countries will then be given 50 days to update or improve the information given to the U.S. government. If those countries do not comply, more travel restrictions may be added.

IARP 2016 Annual Report

Written on February 28, 2017, by

The 2016 IARP Annual Report is now available. The report includes a letter from our Directors, current board and staff lists, impact by the numbers, financials and a complete list of IARP individual donors and supporters.

Thank you so much to everyone who helped make 2016 an impactful year for IARP and our community.

Click this link to Download/View.

 

Iraqi Voices Screening at my school- Nicole

Written on February 28, 2017, by

Written by IARP intern Nicole Rash

The Iraqi Voices’ film, Our Iraq, was screened at the University of Minnesota and hosted by he Immigration History Research Center. There were about 60 students and faculty present at the event.

The 20-minute documentary was followed by a discussion with audience members. The discussion was led by Assistant Professor Joseph Farag, an expert of Arabic Literature and Culture at the University of Minnesota. The discussion started with him describing his reactions and the process of developing this film. The producers of the film wanted to showcase the Iraq’s rich culture and history, not the Iraq portrayed in today’s media. Next, the students were able to ask questions. Students were curious about the size of the Iraqi community here in Minneapolis as well as the location of the biggest Iraqi community in the United States. In addition, people wanted further elaboration on the intentions of the filmmakers because the process was so passionate.

While I was walking around the room taking a few pictures, I was noticing that everyone seemed engaged and interested in this topic and the community. Students asked for more information about where to find the video to show their friends. This showed that people wanted to spread the word about Iraqi culture and wanted to be involved locally.

We ended the  discussion with reactions. Students were surprised with the depth and richness of Iraq’s history and culture. While some students thought that some of this culture has been lost due to the wars, others believed that the Iraqi culture has been resilient and continues to thrive.

I was so happy to be a part of an event that highlighted the beauty of Iraqi culture, and to be able to share that understanding with my peers.It was clear to me that people enjoyed the film, especially the grocery store scene.

The Minnesota Caravan of Love

Written on February 15, 2017, by

This blog post was written by IARP intern Allie Harris.

On an unseasonably warm winter day in Minneapolis, over 5000 people gathered to show love. The MN Caravan of Love was a march in solidarity with immigrants, refugees, and all those impacted by the new travel restrictions.

I am honored to have been a part of this event. We marched, we chanted, we wrote love letters, but most importantly we loved one another as neighbors, friends, and family. Along the two mile route, flowers, balloons, and letters were handed to local immigrants. The streets echoed with “No hate. No fear. Refugees are welcome here.” Halfway through the route, the group stopped to hear speeches by inspirational individuals from countries affected by the executive order. They told stories of tragedy and of hope. The march concluded on the University of Minnesota campus with a celebration including more speeches, singers, and dancers.

How to Protect Yourself in the Face of New Ban

Written on February 3, 2017, by

What we know about The Executive Order:

 

  • A ban on entry for 90 days of all immigrants and non-immigrants, for nationals of Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, and Yemen. This seems to be affecting US permanent residents (green card holders) as well
  • Stops most refugee admissions for at least four months: 120-day pause in refugee admissions to the U.S with exceptions permitted for those fleeing religious persecution if their religion is a minority in their country of nationality
  • Blocks refugees from war-torn Syria from entering the U.S. indefinitely.
  • Caps total refugee admissions for fiscal year 2017 at 50,000- less than half of the 110,000 proposed by the Obama administration

Click here for the full executive order text with annotations.

 

How to protect yourself:

 

  • If you are a non-citizen, even a green card holder (lawful permanent resident), it is recommended to not travel outside of the U.S. without consulting an immigration attorney during the 90-day period.
  • If you are a non-citizen, even a green card holder, and you leave the U.S. you will most likely be denied reentry.
  • If you are a green card holder and are outside of the U.S. fill out the USCIS G-28. It will officially appoint you an immigration attorney to represent you when you land. Have the form completed before boarding your flight. Here is link to the G-28.
  • If you are a green card holder (lawful permanent resident) do not sign an I-407 at the airport or border. Instead ask for the supervisor who handles LPR admissions. If you sign the I-407, you will be giving up your green card. Here is a link to the I-407.
  • Do not hesitate to call an immigration attorney to understand your specific case. We recommend that you call CAIR number: (408-986-9874 or 415-848-7711)
  • Do not allow immigration officers in your home without a warrant. If they do have a warrant, make sure to have an immigration lawyer before speaking.

 

CAIR-MN’s 8 Know Your Rights Tips for travelers & immigrants:

 

  1. Do not leave the US if you are you here on a visa from the following countries Iraq Iran Libya Somalia Sudan Syria and Yemen
  2. Regardless of your immigration status contact CAIR are or a trusted immigration attorney before traveling outside the United States
  3. If you know of anyone traveling to the US have them contact CAIR our office or trusted immigration attorney near the airport of entry
  4. Do not submit any forms for immigration benefits without first contacting an attorney for review and guidance.
  5. Do Not speak with or sign any documents from law enforcements or any immigrants immigration officers without first contacting an attorney.
  6. Always carry valid immigration documents with you (ex.-green card or work permit).
  7. Keep copies of all your immigration documents in your car and at your home.
  8. Keep all foreign documents in a safe place and do NOT carry them with you.

 

 

 

 

 

 

IARP response to Executive Order on Immigrants and Refugees

Written on February 3, 2017, by

January 28th, 2017

Dear friends,

We are deeply troubled regarding the Executive Order targeting our refugee, immigrant, and Muslim communities. It flies in the face of the American values we hold dear. Religious freedom is a key tenet in our constitution, and the persecution of one faith threatens the protection of all faiths. The United States Constitution expressly protects individuals from persecution perpetrated by their own government. This includes bigotry based on faith, on nation of origin, and skin color.

This announcement is especially heart wrenching for our Syrian, Iraqi, Iranian, Libyan, Somali, Sudanese and Yemeni community members who are waiting to be reunited with a sister, brother, parent or child. These refugees are our coworkers, neighbors, friends, business owners, community leaders, and fellow American citizens and voters.

As an organization whose mission is to promote reconciliation between the people of the US and the people of Iraq in response to the devastation of the US invasion and occupation that has affected Iraqi families, society, and culture, we find this news horrifying. This announcement would bar many Iraqis who are eligible for the Special Immigrant Visas (SIVs) and who face persecution due to their work alongside U.S. troops. The US government must not abandon the little responsibility it has taken regarding the consequences of the US invasion and occupation of Iraq.

We recommend that you take a look at the steps the Arab American Institute has outlined to stand against the ban here. We also recommend reaching out to CAIR with any legal questions at 612-206-3360 or email them at info@mn.cair.com. Please do not hesitate to reach out to us at IARP with any questions or concerns.

In the upcoming weeks, please reach out to your immigrant, refugee, Muslim, Arab, South Asian, and Latin American neighbors, and let them know you care and stand with them in solidarity.

Sincerely,
Your IARP Team

 

What we know about the Executive Order:

 

  • A ban on entry for 90 days of all immigrants and non-immigrants, for nationals of Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, and Yemen. This seems to be affecting US permanent residents (green card holders) as well.
  • Stops most refugee admissions for at least four months: 120-day pause in refugee admissions to the U.S. with exceptions permitted for those fleeing religious persecution if their religion is a minority in their country of nationality.
  • Blocks refugees from war-torn Syria from entering the U.S. indefinitely.
  • Caps total refugee admissions for fiscal year 2017 at 50,000 – less than half of the 110,000 proposed by the Obama administration.

 

 

What is the current vetting system like?

The current vetting system for incoming refugees is extremely thorough. Learn more here.

 

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Meet Our New Intern: Nicole

Written on February 1, 2017, by

Hello, my name is Nicole and I am currently a student at the University of Minnesota. I am a senior studying global studies with a focus in the Middle East and human rights and justice. I am also a French major and an Arabic minor. I am from Minneapolis, so it is exciting to be more involved in my community, and to pursue my passions locally. I am very thankful to have the opportunity to work with an organization that I strongly support.

New Winterization Project in Mosul

Written on January 18, 2017, by

IARP would like to show appreciation to all who have supported the window winterization project in Mosul. Working in partnership with the Critical Needs Support Foundation, IARP has been able to fund the winterization of 10 family homes. This project is focused on the Alkhadraa neighborhood which was liberated from ISIS in October of 2016. During the conflict, many homes and apartments suffered damage. In order to help these families prepare for the cold winter months, CNSF is sealing windows with heavy plastic. This simple service allows families to remain in their homes despite cold winter winds.

CNSF is an Iraqi non-governmental organization aimed at providing support to those impacted by the ongoing war with ISIS. CNSF also helps the people of Iraq through projects such as medical assistance, orphan support, and emergency relief. For more information on their projects, visit the CNSF website.

To help support other humanitarian projects, visit the Humanitarian Projects for Peace page.

Meet our new intern: Allie Harris

Written on December 26, 2016, by

Hello, my name is Allie Harris. I have a Bachelor’s degree in Religious Studies and finished my Master’s in Islamic Studies in June. After finishing my degree in Denver, I moved north to the Twin Cities. So far, I am loving Minnesota and I could not be more excited to be involved in IARP. I am lucky to have this opportunity to be more involved in my new community, continue in the field I am passionate about, and, hopefully, work on my Arabic language skills.

Hygiene kits and Dignity Baskets

Written on December 14, 2016, by

IARP has been grateful to partner with the Critical Needs Support Foundation (CNSF) on a Humanitarian Project for Peace to bring hygiene kits and sanitation products to IDP’s in Iraq. The recent kits were for the people of Mosul who have fled from IS (Daesh). The CNSF team are working tirelessly on the ground to identify and respond to those in need.

The most recent distribution consisted of:

  • 68 hygiene kits in Al Haj Ali Village, south of Mosul, Ninewa Province

  • 60 hygiene kits in Hamam Al Alil, south of Mosul near Al Qayyarah, Ninewa Province

  • 270 Dignity Baskets in Alkhazer Camp, for displaced Iraqis feeling from Mosul (this distribution was funded in part by IARP and other humanitarian organizations).

 

The Dignity Baskets contained feminine hygiene products. The Hygiene Kits distributed in the villages each contained:

  • 1x towel

  • 5x toothbrush

  • 1x toothpaste

  • 1x shampoo

  • 1x body-wash

  • 1x baby shampoo

  • 1x lice shampoo

  • 1x q-tip

  • 1x feminine hygiene kit

  • 1x sponge pack for dish-washing

  • 1x dish-washing liquid

  • 1x plastic box

Here is a note from our partners at CNSF:

“Again, we thank you so much for your incredible support. You have helped us reduce risks to people’s health in a very simple but effective way. Disease can spread quickly, making an already difficult situation even more so. Most importantly, you are helping us protect their dignity.”